Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
Inspect your furnace thermostat by first making sure that it’s turned on. Also, ensure that the thermostat switch is turned to “heat” and not “cool”. If your furnace will still not start with the thermostat on, try adjusting the temperature settings to a few degrees higher. Inspect any visible wires for breaks or splits, and make sure your thermostat batteries are not dead. Do not touch any open wires; contact a professional.

Not to mention, John Betlem offers emergency services, too, so you and your family won’t have to suffer in the cold for long if your furnace breaks down. What’s more, when you have a service agreement with us, we’ll give you priority service – we’ll put you to the top of our list for your emergency furnace repair, even during our busier times. When you have a service agreement, you’ll get an annual tune-up, too – and that makes it less likely that you’ll need emergency furnace repairs.
With more than 100 years in the industry, Lennox has always provided industry-leading innovation and technology while upholding strict durability and reliability standards. The professionals at Paso Robles Heating and Air help bring those standards to Paso Robles so that you can always have whole home comfort. If you’re looking for a new HVAC system or even if you just have a question about what we offer, give us a shout at 805-203-8667 or set up an appointment with us online. We’d love to hear from you. 
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.

A Bit Pricy For the Work Done But It Was A Necessary Fix That Required The Tech To Make A Trip To Home Depot And Back. When Calling For The Repair I Expected A Much More Severe Problem That If I Had Been Correct Would Have Been A Much More Expensive Fix. The Problem Turned Out To Be A Simple Problem That Required The Tech To Make A Trip To Home Depot For A $10 Part Afterwhich He Was Able To R&R The Part In About Two Minutes. Problem Solved.

HVAC Repair Co

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